©
The Time Landfill
This is my sanctuary. Click to learn a little About Me
This is my food blog: Pretty Flavors
Own nothing unless stated so.
لا إله إلا اللّه

 Million lovely stains in my heart

Notes
Notes

The sexual exploitation of women is especially predominant in advertising, which is impossible to escape because ads are omnipresent. Thin, barely clothed bodies appear in magazines and on the backs of buses. Intimate close-up shots of smoky bedroom eyes belonging to a woman wearing only lace negligee stare down at passerby from high billboards. Pelvic shots and chiseled bodies come through the television and the computer. They are in every clothing store and adorn the pages of weekly sales circulars.

The mechanism used in these ads is quite simple: Attractive bodies are employed to grab attention and simulate desire, which advertisers hope will then be transferred to the product. Buy the beer, get the girl. In this way, women’s bodies are equated with commodities, presented as rewards of consumption. By instructing men to regard women’s bodies as objects, ads help create an atmosphere that devalues women as people, encourages sexual harassment, and worse (Jacobson and Mazur 1995:84).

Often times the women portrayed in these ads are not even whole. The pictures show only legs, torsos, or an open mouth with rouge lip color provocatively placed atop a glass bottle. This reduces women to collections of parts, something less than human. This objectification and sexploitation has changed the rules of society and along with it the attitudes of men and women have changed.

Just as simple films relying on crude jokes and violence are perfect for the global marketplace, since they require little translation, so is advertising that relies entirely on image. Bare breasts and phallic symbols are understood everywhere. As are the nude female buttocks featured in the Italian and German ads for similar worthless products to remedy the imaginary problem of cellulite. Unfortunately, such powerful imagery of[ten] pollutes the cultural environment (Kilbourne 1999:72).

Notes

generic-art:

5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 

Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.

Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.

“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

Much better version of the same subject matter I posted earlier.

Notes
Notes

queenconsuelabananahammock:

angfdz:

me: *has an opinion*

me: *realizes that my opinion is a result of my limited world view*

me: *stays in my lane*

image

THIS POST IS SO IMPORTANT

Notes
qingdom:

Eid with the gang; chilling in the park. I love this picture. Eid mubarak from Ohio!


Wow! 700+ notes! I wasn’t expecting that.

qingdom:

Eid with the gang; chilling in the park. I love this picture. Eid mubarak from Ohio!

Wow! 700+ notes! I wasn’t expecting that.

Notes
Notes
Notes
alaskastardust:

I HAVE MADE A MISTAKE

alaskastardust:

I HAVE MADE A MISTAKE

Notes
woods-baby:

drying chamomile from my garden

woods-baby:

drying chamomile from my garden

Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes

umarbit:

Psychologically, one of the worst feelings in the world is knowing you did the best you could and it still wasn’t good enough.

Notes